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Banks On Minds Of Voters in 2012

Approaching a pivotal time in the voting year Americans find themselves sifting through many personal conflicts and refining their beliefs in what a leader should look like. Progressive minds are still waiting to see the full promise of President Obama or the Rise of Ron Paul, someone to best match the image of a man they bought in 2008. Republicans are still reeling from the bad taste of the ‘Bush’ era though they seem to have finally picked their champion of generalized right-wing interest in Mitt Romney.

In the middle, there is a litany of arguments, misinformation and pundits playing their own part in swaying the middle class in the most profitable direction possible. There is not enough spin in the world to hide a failing national economy where the rich only get richer, and the job market continues to worsen. This year, it’s hard to imagine any person that can endure the obstacles of becoming president and then want to change the rules that got them there. Mitt Romney didn’t get  to where he is by helping the poor, but it doesn’t seem any candidate is doing much for the middle class either.

It’s important to remember that the Obama administration brought with it an explosion of hope in the beginning, yet along the way also emerged public rebellion and lashing out toward government spending. When Time Magazine picked “We are 99%” as the top quote of 2011, it was a telling statement for how the majority voters really feel about the decisions made on their behalf by a small elite. The formation of the Tea Party, relentless Wall Street protests and a nationwide ‘Occupy’ movement was feverish in 2011. The reality of going broke has unified the public as well as their perspective of Greedy government. It’s no longer a fringe group that’s upset and mobilizing, it’s everyone.

What about a candidate that by pure philosophy alone seems to stand for everything the modern voter is looking for? Ron Paul claims to represent real fiscal conservatism with a liberal aggression toward banks, the Fed, and a list of other credit driving culprits. He’s anti-war, anti-oil, pro-education and against imprisoning people for petty drug use. One major problem with Ron Paul is that he’s still attached to a party that’s spent decades pushing legislation that mostly opposes these ideas. Since his own party as well as the media downplays his position in every step of the race, it seems that Ron Paul is more of non-factor despite being the best “people” candidate that Republicans really have to offer.

Campaign reform is slow and without incentive by those in control to enforce it. Perhaps the worst conflict within the American voting mind is the realization that any leadership in this country can be effectively swayed by corporate interest and lobbying from the elite. Americans are living in an era that makes them increasingly vulnerable to the usury hidden behind borrowing money. Those who have been afflicted the worst by this consistent problem may carry extra hesitation and frustration in the voting booth in 2012. That is because the last two administrations have already proven that whoever the voter chooses for president, they’ll be electing the bank’s best interest instead of their own.

Discussion

2 Responses to “Banks On Minds Of Voters in 2012”

  1. Outside of foreign policy and civil liberties, Paul totally loses me. Paul doesn’t believe in funding education, health care for all, or basically anything on a governmental level, so he is out of the question for me. That doesn’t represent the interests of the people to me.

    Posted by Justin McAffee | February 3, 2012, 4:35 pm
  2. I hear a lot of fallacies when it comes to politics.

    American Politics, it’s about the party

    Putin’s politics, it isn’t about the party, it’s about the man (referring to himself).

    Ron Paul, it isn’t about the party, or myself, it is about the message.

    Last bit I wanted to comment on “Perhaps the worst conflict within the American voting mind is the realization that any leadership in this country can be effectively swayed by corporate interest and lobbying from the elite.”
    Obama’s & Romney’s biggest donators have been the banks & special interests. Paul’s has been grass root (small donations by people), while special interest don’t bother with Paul because he has made it clear to them he can’t be bought out. Shows Paul is the best choice.

    As well saying “Since his own party as well as the media downplays his position in every step of the race, it seems that Ron Paul is more of non-factor” tells me you’re giving them too much credit & helping them in the process. If Paul was a non factor we wouldn’t be talking about the FED, about ending the wars, about not bailing out special interests.

    All in all horrible reporting that just equates more gossip than anything informing.

    Posted by Vhan | February 3, 2012, 3:48 pm

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